The Taste of Fall – National Pumpkin Cheesecake Day!

Pumpkin and Cheesecake – Yum!

Perfect pairings deserve a special day. Pumpkin and cheesecake have their day on October 21. National Pumpkin Cheesecake Day celebrates the delicious combination of flavors that turns pumpkin, sugar, spice, and cream cheese into a sweet, creamy, favorite dessert for autumn.

Here are three delicious recipes for you to enjoy. Two are classic baked versions, ideal for ending a holiday or special meal. The other is an easy no-bake version using cupcake cups, for anytime. Enjoy!

Pumpkin Cheesecake



1 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs

1/3 cup butter or margarine, melted

1/4 cup granulated sugar


3 packages (8 oz. each) cream cheese, softened

1 cup granulated sugar

1/4 cup packed light brown sugar

2 large eggs

1 can (15 oz.) pure pumpkin

2/3 cup (5 fl.-oz can) evaporated milk

2 tablespoons cornstarch

1 1/4 teaspoons ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg


1 container (16 oz.) sour cream, at room temperature

1/3 cup granulated sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract


PREHEAT oven to 350° F.

Combine graham cracker crumbs, butter, and granulated sugar in medium bowl. Press onto bottom and 1 inch up side of 9-inch springform pan. Bake for 6 to 8 minutes (do not allow to brown). Cool on wire rack for 10 minutes.

Beat cream cheese, granulated sugar and brown sugar in large mixer bowl until fluffy. Beat in eggs, pumpkin, and evaporated milk. Add cornstarch, cinnamon, and nutmeg; beat well. Pour into crust. Bake for 55 to 60 minutes or until edge is set but center still moves slightly.

Combine sour cream, granulated sugar, and vanilla extract in small bowl; mix well. Spread over surface of warm cheesecake. Bake for 5 minutes. Cool on wire rack. Refrigerate for several hours or overnight. Remove side of springform pan.

Very Best Baking by Nestle


IngredientsBourbon Pumpkin Cheesecake


3/4 cup graham cracker crumbs (from five 4 3/4- by 2 1/4-inch crackers)

1/2 cup pecans or walnuts (1 3/4 ounces), finely chopped

1/4 cup packed light brown sugar

1/4 cup granulated sugar

1/2 stick (1/4 cup) unsalted butter, melted and cooled


1 1/2 cups canned solid-pack pumpkin

3 large eggs

1/2 cup packed light brown sugar

2 tablespoons heavy cream

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 tablespoon bourbon liqueur or bourbon (optional)

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1 tablespoon cornstarch

1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

1/2 teaspoon salt

3 (8-ounce) packages cream cheese, at room temperature


2 1/2 cups sour cream (20 ounces)

2 tablespoons granulated sugar

1 tablespoon bourbon liqueur or bourbon (optional)

Garnish: pecan halves


Make crust:

Invert bottom of a 9-inch springform pan (to create flat bottom, which will make it easier to remove cake from pan), then lock on side and butter pan. Stir together crumbs, pecans, sugars, and butter in a bowl until combined well. Press crumb mixture evenly onto bottom and 1/2 inch up side of pan, then chill crust, 1 hour.

Make filling and bake cheesecake: Put oven rack in middle position and Preheat oven to 350°F. Whisk together pumpkin, eggs, brown sugar, cream, vanilla, and liqueur (if using) in a bowl until combined. Stir together granulated sugar, cornstarch, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and salt in large bowl. Add cream cheese and beat with an electric mixer at high speed until creamy and smooth, about 3 minutes. Reduce speed to medium, then add pumpkin mixture and beat until smooth. Pour filling into crust, smoothing top, then put springform pan in a shallow baking pan (in case springform leaks). Bake until center is just set, 50 to 60 minutes. Transfer to rack and cool 5 minutes. (Leave oven on.)

Make topping: Whisk together sour cream, sugar, and liqueur (if using) in a bowl, then spread on top of cheesecake and bake 5 minutes.

Cool cheesecake completely in pan on rack, about 3 hours. Chill, covered, until cold, at least 4 hours. Remove side of pan and bring to room temperature before serving.

Cooks’ note: Baked cheesecake can be chilled, covered, up to 2 days.

Recipe adapted from: Gourmet Magazine, Bourbon Pumpkin Cheesecake

No-bake Pumpkin Cheesecake Cups

IngredientsNo-bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

1-1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs, plus 2 tablespoons to sprinkle on top

2 tablespoons packed brown sugar

5 tablespoons melted butter

1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, softened

1/3 cup granulated sugar

1/3 cup canned pure pumpkin

1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice

½ cup cold heavy whipping cream


Place 12 paper baking liners in a muffin pan. Using a mixer, thoroughly mix graham cracker crumbs, brown sugar, and melted butter in a bowl. Distribute evenly between 12 baking cups, approximately 2 tablespoons per cup, and pack firmly (I used the back of a small ladle) to make crust. Freeze 10 minutes.

In a large bowl, with an electric mixer, beat cream cheese and sugar on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Mix in pumpkin and pumpkin pie spice until combined.

In separate bowl, beat whipping cream with electric mixer on high until stiff peaks form. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture until just combined.

Spoon and spread cream cheese mixture into each muffin cup, dividing evenly. Cover and refrigerate about 4 hours or until filling is set and chilled.

Just before serving, Sprinkle muffin cups with graham cracker crumbs.



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Federal Income Tax Credits for Energy Efficiency

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2017 Federal Tax Credits

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Tax credits for Solar Energy Systems are available at 30% through December 31, 2019.
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*  The tax credit information contained within this website is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for expert advice from a professional tax/financial planner or the IRS.

Market Watch

Housing Data Cooled to Close Out Summer 

Home sales and Housing Starts cooled in August, but Building Permits were hot.

The National Association of REALTORS® reported that Existing Home Sales fell

1.7 percent in August from July to an annual rate of 5.35 million units versus the 5.42 million expected. Sales were up just 0.2 percent over the prior year.

Mother Nature dampened New Home Sales data. The Commerce Department reported that Hurricanes Harvey and Irma impacted data reporting for August, driving New Home Sales down 3.4 percent from July to an annual rate of 560,000 units. Sale status was collected for only 65 percent of cases in Texas and Florida counties affected by the hurricanes versus the normal response rate of 95 percent. New home inventory had a 6.1-month supply in August, up from 5.7 in July, which was a welcome sign.

New construction may encourage buyers yet this fall, but the numbers weren’t favorable in August. The Commerce Department reported that Housing Starts fell for the second straight month, slipping 0.8 percent from July to an annual rate of 1.18 million units. On a positive note, year-over-year Housing Starts rose 1.4 percent. Single-family starts, the biggest share of the housing market, rose 1.6 percent. Building Permits rose 5.7 percent from July, hitting their highest level since January.

Home prices continued to increase. Research firm CoreLogic reported that home prices rose 6.9 percent from August 2016 to August 2017, up from a 6.7 percent annual gain in July.

News From the Fed
The Federal Reserve announced plans to unwind its massive $4.5 trillion balance sheet starting on the ninth business day of October and continuing every ninth business day of the month thereafter. The balance sheet is made up of Mortgage Backed Securities and Treasury Bonds. The plan is designed to cause little disruption to the market. Seeing that this has never been done before, it remains to be seen what happens over time to Mortgage Bond prices and the home loan rates tied to them.

For now, home loan rates remain just above all-time lows. Stay tuned for your next quarterly update in January.

Preparing Your Home For Sale – Home Staging Tips

Housing Outlook 2016

What will 2016 bring for the housing market? If the predictions are correct, this year will be great for real estate. This month, I’m sending you information about what should be a bright 2016 for home buyers and sellers. Want to learn more about what this year’s real estate projections could mean for you? Give me a call! And remember, I’m never too busy for any of your referrals.

Housing Outlook 2016

How To Pay Your Mortgage Off Faster

If you’re like many Americans with a mortgage, you’re probably looking for ways to pay it off sooner. You’re in luck! Below are some great tips to help you reduce your principal and eliminate your mortgage debt faster, so that you have more money in your bank account for retirement, investments or a relaxing tropical vacation. If you’re among the one-in-three lucky homeowners who have paid off their mortgage, forward this information on to family or friends who are seeking to pay off their mortgage debt.

Mortgage Pay Off

Keep Your Pets Safe This Holiday Season

Pets Safe This Holiday

Fort Collins Monthly Housing Report – October Indicators

New Listings were down 18.6 percent for single family homes and 11.6 percent
for townhouse-condo properties. Pending Sales landed at 220 for single family
homes and 75 for townhouse-condo properties.
The Median Sales Price was up 11.1 percent to $350,000 for single family
homes and 29.3 percent to $258,600 for townhouse-condo properties. Days on
Market decreased 6.4 percent for single family homes but increased 13.9
percent for condo properties.
Builder confidence is as high as it has been in more than a decade, yet the pace
of economic growth has been slow enough to cause pause. A low number of
first-time buyer purchases and a looming demographic shift also seem to be
curbing the desire to start new single-family construction projects. As older
Americans retire and downsize, single-family listings are expected to rise. The
waiting is the hardest part.

See link below for full FCBR Report:

Apple Butter Recipe for Fall


Go Broncos!